ME agenda: update on status of this site

ME agenda: update on status of this site

This site was created in June 2007 for ME patients, carers and advocates and provided information, resources and commentary on the political issues affecting the lives of UK Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) patients.

In 2009, my primary advocacy focus shifted towards monitoring the development of DSM-5* (published May 2013) and ICD-11 (currently scheduled for presentation to the World Health Assembly in May 2018).

In 2010, I created Dx Revision Watch (originally DSM-5 and ICD-11 Watch) specifically for monitoring the development of these two classification systems.

ME agenda site will remain online for its post archives (Post Index to approximately 980 posts) and for occasional, important information relating specifically to ICD-11, DSM-5 and ICD-10-CM.

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I have a number of other WordPress.com sites:

http://suzychapman.wordpress.com/ status: extension site for Dx Revision Watch for occasional, selected material.

Twenty-six soldiers of lead status: extension site to ME agenda for occasional, selected material.

Read ME UK Events status: archived.

Read ME UK Events was created in March 2008 in response to the considerable concerns surrounding the April 2008 Royal Society of Medicine conference on “Chronic Fatigue Syndrome” and to promote the various protests that were staged.

Suzy Chapman can be contacted via the Dx Revision Watch Contact page

Follow Dx Revision Watch on Twitter @dxrevisionwatch

*DSM; DSM-IV; DSM-IV-TR; DSM-IV-PC; DSM-V; DSM V; DSM-5; DSM 5 are registered trademarks of the American Psychiatric Association

New Twitter address and new domain for Dx Revision Watch

New Twitter address and new domain for Dx Revision Watch

Please note the domain for the sister site, Dx Revision Watch, has changed to

http://dxrevisionwatch.com

Previous links to posts and pages are being mapped across to the new domain but you may like to update Bookmarks and update links to the Home Page on websites and blogs.

The Twitter page associated with both sites has also changed from

http://twitter.com/meagenda

to

http://twitter.com/dxrevisionwatch

@dxrevisionwatch

Recent posts on Dx Revision Watch: ICD-11 Beta draft updates

Recent posts on Dx Revision Watch: ICD-11 Beta draft updates, DSM-5 Development site

Changes to ICD-11 Beta drafting platform: Bodily Distress Disorders (1)

Post #190 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2jB

This report updates on recent changes to the Somatoform Disorders section of the ICD-11 Beta drafting platform.

ICD-11 Beta drafting platform: Update (2):

Neurasthenia, Postviral fatigue syndrome (PVFS), Benign myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), Fibromyalgia (FM), Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

Post #193 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2mC

The report in this post updates on current proposals for the ICD-11 Beta drafting platform for revision of the following ICD-10 categories: Neurasthenia, Postviral fatigue syndrome (PVFS), Benign myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), Fibromyalgia (FM) and Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) for the full version of ICD-11…

ICD-11 Revision Beta drafting process: stakeholder participation

Post #194 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2nw

Changes to content on DSM-5 Development site (1)

Post #189 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2jn

Content embargo

According to American Psychiatric Association’s (APA) recently published, highly restrictive DSM-5 Permissions Policy – following closure of the third and final public review, the content of DSM-5 will be under strict embargo until the manual is published…

Save

Update One from Dx Revision Watch January, 2012

Update One from Dx Revision Watch January, 2012

Dx Revision Watch
http://dxrevisionwatch.wordpress.com/

18 January 2012

When is the third and final public review of proposals for DSM-5 expected?

No firm date as yet. The DSM-5 Timeline still has a third and final review listed for January-February, for a two month long stakeholder review and comment period [2].

This information is outdated.

The APA has announced that its field trials are running behind schedule and some trials won’t now be completed until March, this year.

The third and final draft is now expected to be released for public review and comment, “no later than May 2012″, according to DSM-5 Task Force Vice-chair, Darrel Regier, MD [3].

I will update as more information becomes available about the posting of the third and final draft.

DSM-5 proposals with the most relevance for us are the proposals of the “Somatic Symptom Disorders” Work Group for the revision of existing DSM-IV “Somatoform Disorders” categories. The SSD Work Group’s current proposals can be found on the DSM-5 Development website [4].

DSM-5 Reform iPetition for professionals:

An Open Letter and Petition sponsored by an ad hoc committee of the Society for Humanistic Psychology (Division 32 of the American Psychological Association), in alliance with several other American Psychological Association Divisions, has attracted nearly 11,000 signatures with 40 mental health professional bodies and mental health organizations publicly endorsing the Open Letter [5].

The “Coalition for DSM-5 Reform” committee is calling on the American Psychiatric Association to submit its draft proposals for new categories and criteria for DSM-5 to independent scientific review.

Please note that the Society for Humanistic Psychology iPetition is for signing by mental health professionals and allied mental health professionals; it is not intended for signing by patients.

American Psychiatric Publishing serves “cease and desist” letters and threats of legal action against Suzy Chapman:

The site formerly operating under the subdomain dsm5watch.wordpress.com and known as DSM-5 and ICD-11 Watch is now known as Dx Revision Watch Monitoring the development of DSM-5, ICD-11, ICD-10-CM and operating at http://dxrevisionwatch.wordpress.com/

The issuing of legal threats on behalf of the American Psychiatric Association, just before Christmas, has generated considerable interest and outrage amongst blogging mental health professionals [6].

I am collating commentaries from Allen Frances MD, who had chaired the DSM-IV Task Force, Bernard Carroll MD, Margaret Soltan PhD, Dan Carlat MD, Howard Brody MD, PhD, Jack Carney DSW, author Gary Greenberg, Steve Balt MD, Paula J. Caplan PhD, Mindhacks, Daniel Lende, 1 Boring Old Man (Mickey Nardo MD), James Gaulte MD, and advocates in Post #123, on this page of my site: http://wp.me/pKrrB-1Bi

References:

1] DSM-5 Development site

2] DSM-5 Timeline

3] DSM-5 Task Force Ponders Round 2 of Public Feedback, Deborah Brauser for Medscape Medical News, August 31, 2011

4] Somatic Symptom Disorders

Complex Somatic Symptom Disorder (CSSD) criteria

Simple Somatic Symptom Disorder (SSSD) criteria

Key documents:

       Disorders Description

       Rationale/Validity Propositions

5] Coalition for DSM-5 Reform (an ad hoc committee of the Society for Humanistic Psychology, Division 32 of the American Psychological Association) Open Letter and Petition for Professionals: http://dsm5-reform.com/

6] Coverage of APA’s threats of legal action against Suzy Chapman: http://wp.me/pKrrB-1Bi

Suzy Chapman
_____________________

http://dxrevisionwatch.wordpress.com
https://meagenda.wordpress.com
http://www.facebook.com/MEagenda
http://twitter.com/MEagenda

Position statement (ICD-10-CM proposed coding issue)

Position statement (ICD-10-CM proposed coding issue)

Shortlink: http://wp.me/p5foE-3kj

25 September 2011

Since I continue to be misrepresented on at least one platform I am reluctantly publishing a public position statement.

ME agenda is the name of one of several WordPress sites that I own. The site name was registered with WordPress in 2007. ME agenda is also the username I use on Facebook, Twitter and on a number of other internet platforms.

Within the last few days, ME agenda has several times been referred to as “a group” on Phoenix Rising forum and elsewhere. I have already clarified that ME agenda is not a “group” nor any kind of organisation.

On the Disclaimer page of my Dx Revision Watch website it states:

Dx Revision Watch is not an organisation.

“This site has no connection with and is not endorsed by the American Psychiatric Association (APA), American Psychiatric Publishing Inc., World Health Organisation (WHO) or any other organisation, institution, corporation or company.

“This site has no affiliations with any commercial or not-for-profit organisation. The site operates independently of any patient or advocacy organisation or group.

“This site does not accept advertising, sponsorship, funding or donations and has no commercial links with any organisation, institution, corporation, company or individual.”

On my ME agenda website Disclaimer page it also states:

ME agenda is not an organisation.

“This site has no connection with and is not endorsed by any organisation, institution, corporation or company. The site has no affiliations with any commercial or not-for-profit organisation and operates independently of any patient or advocacy organisation or group.

“This site does not accept advertising, sponsorship, funding or donations and has no commercial links with any organisation, institution, corporation, company or individual.”

So ME agenda is not “a group”; does not function as “a group” nor as any form of organisation, and the name ME agenda and my websites are associated only with one individual – myself.

The advocacy work that I do under my own name and in association with the name ME agenda is undertaken as an individual with an interest in a specific health area, as a primary carer of a young adult. I do not claim a mandate to represent others and the views and opinions I hold are the views and opinions of a single individual.

I therefore request that neither I nor ME agenda nor my websites are referred to on any platform as “a group”, since this is erroneous and misrepresents me.

It has also been misstated on Phoenix Rising forum and elsewhere, that I am “trying to get CFS reclassified as ME.”

This is not the case and again, misrepresents my position. My position is this:

I consider as an individual, not as any form of “group”, since I am not any form of “group”:

that it will hurt patients if Chronic fatigue syndrome is coded in ICD-10-CM under Chapter 18, the chapter for “Symptoms, signs and ill-defined conditions”, under “R53.82 Chronic fatigue, unspecified > Chronic fatigue syndrome NOS”;

that Chronic fatigue syndrome should be coded to the “G93” parent class, in line with ICD-10, ICD-10-CA (Canada) and ICD-10-GM (Germany), and in line with ICD-11 proposals that Chronic fatigue syndrome should be classified within Chapter 6: Diseases of the nervous system;

that classifying Chronic fatigue syndrome under the Chapter 18 “R” codes, in ICD-10-CM, will render patients more vulnerable to the proposals of the DSM-5 “Somatic Symptom Disorders” workgroup.

These are views shared by other advocates, patients and carers, internationally, by the US CFSAC Committee (the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Advisory Committee that provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of Health and Human Services) and by a number of US 501(c)(3) registered patient advocacy organisations.

At no time have I stated or implied that I am “trying to get CFS reclassified as ME”.

It should also be noted that I have had no involvement in or input into the initiative of the US Coalition4ME/CFS to make representations to the NCHS Committee responsible for updates to the US specific ICD-9-CM and development of ICD-10-CM, which replaces ICD-9-CM in October 2013.

I hope this makes my position clear and I trust that there will be no future misrepresentation of my views or my actions on any platform.

Discussion of the issue of the long-standing proposals for the coding of Chronic fatigue syndrome in ICD-10-CM was on the agenda of the meeting of the ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee which took place on September 14.

An audio of this meeting and PDFs of meeting materials can be accessed from this page on the CDC website:

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/icd/icd9cm_maintenance.htm

These materials and links and related ICD-10-CM coding issue material will be added to this site in due course.

Suzy Chapman
_____________________

http://dxrevisionwatch.wordpress.com
https://meagenda.wordpress.com
http://www.facebook.com/MEagenda
http://twitter.com/MEagenda

Just three days left before second DSM-5 stakeholder review closes

Just three days left before second DSM-5 stakeholder review closes

Shortlink: http://wp.me/p5foE-3jL

On June 16, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) announced an extension to its second public stakeholder review of draft proposals for categories and criteria for the next edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which will be known as “DSM-5”.

The closing date for submissions is now Friday, July 15.

There are just three more days left in which to submit letters of concern in response to the potentially damaging proposals being put forward by the Work Group for “Somatic Symptom Disorders” – the DSM-5 committee charged with the revision of existing DSM-IV “Somatoform Disorders” categories. 

If you haven’t already submitted a comment, please do, however brief. You’ll find  information on making submissions in this post: http://tinyurl.com/DSM-5-register-to-comment.

Proposed criteria and two key documents are posted here: http://wp.me/pKrrB-13z.

For examples of letters of concern, copies of this year’s submissions, including the Coalition4ME/CFS’s resource materials and template letter, are collated here on my Dx Revision Watch site:

http://wp.me/PKrrB-19a 

These include letters of concern from international patient organizations, professional stakeholders, patients, patient advocates and professional bodies.

If you have already submitted but have other points to make, please submit a second response. 

If you know an informed professional please alert them today to the implications for patients with ME, CFS, IBS, FM, CI, CS, Gulf War illness and other illnesses that are bundled under the “Functional Somatic Syndromes” and “Medically Unexplained” umbrellas.

If the Work Group’s current proposals are approved, these illnesses will be sitting ducks for an additional “bolt-on” mental health diagnosis of a “Somatic Symptom Disorder”.

If you haven’t yet registered your concerns, please get a letter in before the feedback period closes on July 15!

Second DSM-5 public review of draft criteria

The closing date for comments in the second DSM-5 public review has been extended to July 15.

Register to submit feedback via the DSM-5 Development website here: http://tinyurl.com/Somatic-Symptom-Disorders

Once registered, log in with username and password and go to page: http://tinyurl.com/DSM-5-CSSD

Copies of this year’s submissions are being collated here: http://wp.me/PKrrB-19a  

Recent posts on Dx Revision Watch site around DSM-5 second public review

Recent posts on Dx Revision Watch site around DSM-5 second public review

Shortlink: http://wp.me/p5foE-3j7

A number of posts have been published recently on Dx Revision Watch, sister site to ME agenda, around the DSM-5 public review, so I am providing an Index:

5 May 2011  Post #73: http://wp.me/pKrrB-12k

American Psychiatric Association (APA) announces second public review of DSM-5 draft criteria and structure

Post announcing launch of second DSM-5 public review period with links to DSM-5 Development site and to media coverage.

6 May 2011  Post #74: http://wp.me/pKrrB-12x

APA News Release 4 May 2011: New Framework Proposed for Manual of Mental Disorders

Copy of APA News Release No. 11-27 announcing the posting on 4 May of revised draft criteria for DSM-5 on the DSM-5 Development website and a second public review period running from May to June 15.

8 May 2011  Post #75: http://wp.me/pKrrB-12P

What are the latest proposals for DSM-5 “Somatic Symptom Disorders” categories and why are they problematic? (Part 1)

Part 1 of this report is a Q & A addressing some of the queries that have been raised with me around the DSM-5 public review process. Includes table comparing “Current DSM-IV Codes and Categories for Somatoform Disorders and ICD-10 Equivalents”. Also includes a screenshot from Chapter 5 (V) Somatoform Disorders (the F codes) F45 – F48.0 (as displaying in the iCAT Alpha Drafting platform in November 2010; this drafting platform has since been replaced by another public Alpha drafting browser launched on 17 May 2011 – see Post #81: ICD-11 Alpha Drafting platform launched 17 May (public version): http://wp.me/pKrrB-16N).

10 May 2011  Post #77: http://wp.me/pKrrB-13z

What are the latest proposals for DSM-5 “Somatic Symptom Disorders” categories and why are they problematic? (Part 2)

In Part 2 of this report, I set out the latest proposals for draft criteria (dated 14 April 2011) from the DSM-5 Somatic Symptom Disorders Work Group, as published on the DSM-5 Development website, on 4 May.

12 May 2011  Post #78: http://wp.me/pKrrB-15q

Registering to submit comment in the second DSM-5 public review of draft criteria

Information on registering for and submitting comment in the second DSM-5 public review.

18 May 2011  Post #80: http://wp.me/pKrrB-15X

What are the latest proposals for DSM-5 “Somatic Symptom Disorders” categories and why are they problematic? (Part 3)

In Part 3 of this report, I posted extracts from “Disorders Description”, the first of the two key PDF documents that accompany the revised proposals, highlighting passages in yellow to indicate why ME and CFS patient representation organizations, professionals and advocates need to register their concerns via this second public review.

22 May 2011   Post #82: http://wp.me/pKrrB-16B

What are the latest proposals for DSM-5 “Somatic Symptom Disorders” categories and why are they problematic? (Part 4)

In Part 4 of this report, I posted the complete text of the key “Rationale” document that accompanies the draft proposals of the Somatic Symptom Disorders Work Group, omitting several pages of references to published and unpublished research papers.

22 May 2011   Post #83: http://wp.me/pKrrB-12d

Call for Action – Second DSM-5 public comment period closes June 15

Sets out why patients, patient organizations, advocates, clinicians, allied health professionals, lawyers and other professional end users need to review the proposals of the Somatic Symptom Disorders Work Group and submit responses. Includes copy of post in Word .doc and PDF formats.

29 May 2011   Post #85: http://wp.me/pKrrB-19o 

Submissions to the first DSM-5 stakeholder review (February to 20 April 2010)

Full copy of the submission made in last year’s DSM-5 public review, by Kenneth Casanova, Board member and past President, Massachusetts CFIDS/ME & FM Association.

29 May 2011   Post #86: http://wp.me/pKrrB-19G

Final Call for Action by UK patient orgs – Second DSM-5 public comment period closes 15 June

2 June 2011   Post #87: http://wp.me/pKrrB-1a1

Action for M.E. publishes news item on DSM-5

Submissions for the 2010 public review are collated here: http://wp.me/PKrrB-AQ

Second DSM-5 public comment period closes 15 June: Final Call for Action

Second DSM-5 public comment period closes 15 June: Final Call for Action by UK patient orgs

Shortlink: http://wp.me/p5foE-3iT

This communication has been sent to the following organizations:

Action for M.E.; The ME Association; AYME; The Young ME Sufferers Trust; The 25% ME Group; RiME; Invest in ME; BRAME; ME Research UK; Mrs Sue Waddle

[Update: On June 1, Action for M.E. published a news item on DSM-5 confirming that it does intend to submit a response.]

Final Call for Action by UK patient organizations

 

Second DSM-5 public comment period closes 15 June

29 May 2011

The above organizations were alerted to this second public review period on 5 May, the day after revised criteria were posted on the American Psychiatric Association’s DSM-5 Development website.

To date, not one patient organization in the UK has confirmed to me that they intend to submit feedback, this year. Please take some time to review these proposals and prepare a submission or consider submitting a joint response with another UK patient organization.

The American Psychiatric Association (APA) DSM-5 Task Force is again accepting public comment on the latest proposals for the revision of DSM diagnostic criteria for psychiatric disorders.

The deadline for this second stakeholder feedback period is June 15 – less than three weeks away!

Is this a US specific issue?

No. UK and international input is required from patient organizations.

The DSM-5 “Somatic Symptom Disorders” Work Group has responsibility for the revision of the existing DSM-IV “Somatoform Disorders” categories. Two UK Professors of psychological medicine and research, Professor Michael Sharpe and Professor Francis Creed, are members of the Somatic Symptom Disorders Work Group.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders is the primary diagnostic system in the US for defining mental disorders and is used to varying extent in other countries. The next edition of the manual is scheduled for publication in 2013 and will inform health care providers and policy makers for many years to come. DSM-5 will shape international research, influence literature in the fields of psychiatry and psychosomatics and inform perceptions of patients’ medical needs throughout the world.

All UK patient organizations need to submit responses in this second review, even if they submitted last year. The latest key documents that expand on the proposals are attached for ease of reference. (Note: These documents have been revised several times since last year’s public review. Yellow highlighting has been applied by the Work Group to indicate edits and revisions between these latest versions and the texts as they had stood, earlier this year.)

What is being proposed?

The DSM-5 “Somatic Symptom Disorders” Work Group is recommending renaming the “Somatoform Disorders” section to “Somatic Symptom Disorders” and combining the existing categories – “Somatoform Disorders”, “Psychological Factors Affecting Medical Condition (PFAMC)” and possibly “Factitious Disorders”, into one group.

(“Somatic” means “bodily” or “of the body”.)

The Work Group also proposes combining “Somatization Disorder”, “Hypochondriasis”, “Undifferentiated Somatoform Disorder” and “Pain Disorder” under a new category entitled “Complex Somatic Symptom Disorder” (CSSD). There is also a “Simple or Abridged Somatic Symptom Disorder” (SSSD) and a proposal to rename “Conversion Disorder” to “Functional Neurological Disorder”.

If the various proposals of the Somatic Symptom Disorders Work Group were approved, there are considerable concerns that patients with a diagnosis of CFS, ME or PVFS, or awaiting diagnosis, would be vulnerable to the application of an additional “bolt-on” mental health diagnosis of a Somatic Symptom Disorder like “CSSD”, “SSSD” or “PFAMD”, or of misdiagnosis with a Somatic Symptom Disorder.

Because the APA and the WHO have a joint commitment to strive for harmonization between category names, glossary descriptions and criteria for DSM-5 and the corresponding categories in Chapter 5 of the forthcoming ICD-11, there could be implications for the revision of the “Somatoform Disorders” section of ICD-10 and therefore implications for UK patients – both adults and children.

Where can I find the full criteria for “CSSD”, “PFAMC” and other proposed categories?

Proposed criteria are set out on the DSM-5 Development site here: http://tinyurl.com/Somatic-Symptom-Disorders

The CSSD criteria are here: http://tinyurl.com/DSM-5-CSSD

There are two key PDF documents, “Disorders Descriptions” and “Rationale”, which expand on the Work Group’s proposals (attached for your convenience)

    Disorders Description   Key Document One: “Somatic Symptom Disorders”

    Rationale Document     Key Document Two: “Justification of Criteria — Somatic Symptoms”

 

Which patient groups might be hurt by these proposals?

The Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Advisory Committee (CFSAC) provides advice and recommendations to the US Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS). On Day One of the May 10-11 CFSAC meeting, CFSAC Committee discussed the implications of these proposals for CFS, ME and Fibromyalgia patients as part of the agenda item around concerns for the proposed coding of CFS for the forthcoming ICD-10-CM.

If the Work Group’s proposals gain DSM Task Force approval, all medical diseases, whether “established general medical conditions or disorders”, like diabetes or heart disease, or conditions presenting with “somatic symptoms of unclear etiology” will have the potential for an additional diagnosis of a “somatic symptom disorder” – if the clinician considers that the patient’s response to their bodily symptoms and concerns about their health or the perception of their level of disability is “disproportionate”, or their coping styles, “maladaptive.”

But as discussed by CFSAC Committee members, patients with CFS, ME, Fibromyalgia and IBS (the so-called “Functional somatic syndromes”) may be especially vulnerable to the highly subjective criteria and difficult to measure concepts such as “disproportionate distress and disability”, “catastrophising”, “health-related anxiety” and “[appraising] bodily symptoms as unduly threatening, harmful, or troublesome.”

In a 2009 Editorial on the progress of the Work Group, the Work Group Chair wrote that by doing away with the “controversial concept of medically unexplained”, their proposed classification might diminish “the dichotomy, inherent in the ‘Somatoform’ section of DSM-IV, between disorders based on medically unexplained symptoms and patients with organic disease.” The conceptual framework the Work Group proposes:

“…will allow a diagnosis of somatic symptom disorder in addition to a general medical condition, whether the latter is a well-recognized organic disease or a functional somatic syndrome such as irritable bowel syndrome or chronic fatigue syndrome.”

In its latest proposals, the Work Group writes:

“…Having somatic symptoms of unclear etiology is not in itself sufficient to make this diagnosis. Some patients, for instance with irritable bowel syndrome or fibromyalgia would not necessarily qualify for a somatic symptom disorder diagnosis. Conversely, having somatic symptoms of an established disorder (e.g. diabetes) does not exclude these diagnoses if the criteria are otherwise met.”

“…The symptoms may or may not be associated with a known medical condition. Symptoms may be specific (such as localized pain) or relatively non-specific (e.g. fatigue). The symptoms sometimes represent normal bodily sensations (e.g., orthostatic dizziness), or discomfort that does not generally signify serious disease…”

“…Patients with this diagnosis tend to have very high levels of health-related anxiety. They appraise their bodily symptoms as unduly threatening, harmful, or troublesome and often fear the worst about their health. Even when there is evidence to the contrary, they still fear the medical seriousness of their symptoms. Health concerns may assume a central role in the individual’s life, becoming a feature of his/her identity and dominating interpersonal relationships.”

These proposals could result in misdiagnosis of a mental health disorder or the misapplication of an additional diagnosis of a mental health disorder in patients with CFS and ME. There may be considerable implications for these highly subjective criteria for the diagnoses assigned to patients, the provision of social care, the payment of employment, medical and disability insurance, the types of treatment and testing insurers and health care providers are prepared to fund, and the length of time for which insurers are prepared to pay out.

Dual-diagnosis of a “general medical condition” or a so-called “functional somatic syndrome” plus a “bolt-on” diagnosis of a “Somatic symptom disorder” may bring thousands more patients, potentially, under a mental health banner where they may be subject to inappropriate treatments, psychiatric services, antidepressants and behavioural therapies such as CBT, for the “modification of dysfunctional and maladaptive beliefs about symptoms and disease, and behavioral techniques to alter illness and sick role behaviors and promote more effective coping [with their somatic symptoms].”

Who should submit comment on these proposals?

All stakeholders are permitted to submit comment and the views of patients, carers, families and advocates are important.

But evidence-based submissions from the perspective of informed medical professionals – clinicians, psychiatrists, researchers, allied health professionals, lawyers and other professional end users are likely to have more influence. Patient organizations also need to submit comment.

Where can I read last year’s submissions?

Copies of international patient organization submissions for the first DSM-5 public and stakeholder review are collated on this page of my site, together with selected patient and advocate submissions:

DSM-5 Submissions to the 2010 review: http://wp.me/PKrrB-AQ

How to comment:

Register to submit feedback via the DSM-5 Development website: http://tinyurl.com/Somatic-Symptom-Disorders

This is the last alert I shall be sending out. I hope all UK patient organisations will take this opportunity to submit their concerns.

Remember, the deadline is June 15.

Thank you.

Suzy Chapman
http://dxrevisionwatch.wordpress.com

Posting of revised draft proposals for DSM-5 criteria postponed until August

The APA has postponed the release of revised draft proposals for DSM-5 criteria by three months

Shortlink: http://wp.me/p5foE-3hZ

Slip slidin’ away…

[Information superceded by second and third DSM-5 draft propoals.]

[1] Screenshot iCAT, ICD-11: Chapter 5: F45 – F48.0: http://dxrevisionwatch.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/2icatchapter5f45somatoform.png

[2] Article: Erasing the interface between psychiatry and medicine (DSM-5), Chapman S, 13 February 2011: http://wp.me/pKrrB-Vn

[3] Article: Revisions to DSM-5 proposals on 14.01.11: New category proposed “Simple Somatic Symptom Disorder, Chapman S, 16 January 2011: http://wp.me/pKrrB-St

[4] DSM-5 Development website: http://www.dsm5.org/about/Pages/Timeline.aspx

“CFS orphaned in the “R” codes in US ICD-10-CM” and “Erasing the interface between psychiatry and medicine” (DSM-5)

Two new posts on Dx Revision Watch

Shortlink: http://wp.me/p5foE-3h3

“CFS orphaned in the “R” codes in US specific ICD-10-CM”

http://wp.me/pKrrB-V4

and

“Erasing the interface between psychiatry and medicine” (DSM-5)

http://wp.me/pKrrB-Vn